One of the Berkman Center’s top priorities is education. Faculty, fellows, and staff affiliated with the Center engage in teaching activities that address complex legal, technological, social, and business issues; examine questions of both public and private law; and integrate relevant international and domestic legal considerations from a global perspective.

These efforts reach students from Harvard Law School and various other Harvard University graduate programs (including the Harvard Graduate School of Design and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences), Harvard College, and Harvard Extension School, as well as interested members of the general public.

The Center places a premium on innovation in pedagogy, with an emphasis on interdisciplinarity, peer-learning, and mentorship. The Digital Problem Solving Initiative serves as one example of a novel teaching and learning initiative, offering participants an opportunity to enhance and cultivate competency in various digital literacies as teams engage with research, design, and policy relating to the digital world The Berkman Center also hosts Harvard Law School’s Cyberlaw Clinic, a first-of-its-kind law school clinical program founded in 1999. The program is designed to offer students real-world opportunities to advise clients on legal issues relating to technology, intellectual property, privacy, online speech, and the like, under the close supervision of practicing attorneys.

The Berkman Center seeks to develop and deploy technology that enhances educational opportunities for instructors and learners alike. The H2O online textbook platform, developed by Berkman Center Director Jonathan Zittrain, demonstrates the Center’s commitment to building tools that allow students and their teachers to engage with course materials.

Finally, the Berkman Center prioritizes engagement not just with Harvard students, or within the academic community more generally, but with the broader public. Efforts such as the Center’s reading group series and the online CopyrightX course taught by Berkman Center Director Terry Fisher reach a wide audience and invite a diverse range of participants to wrestle with issues at the heart of the Center’s work.

Below, this list of Berkman-affiliated courses represents a partial list of these offerings.

Comparative Online Privacy - Spring 2016

Online privacy has become a major issue for Internet users, technology companies, online business, researchers, and policy-makers around the world, as more and more personal information is collected, aggregated, shared, and used across a wide variety of contexts. Policy-makers on both sides of the Atlantic -- and globally -- have been responsive to concerns expressed by users, consumer organizations, activists, and academics, and have proposed an important series of new laws, regulations, and other privacy-enhancing instruments at the international and national level.

Copyright - Spring 2016

This course will explore copyright law and policy. Approximately two thirds of the class time and readings will be devoted to the American copyright system; the remainder will be devoted to the major relevant multilateral treaties and to the laws pertaining to copyright and "neighboring rights" in other countries. Substantial attention will be paid to the efforts by philosophers and economists to justify, reform, or abolish the copyright system.

Cyberlaw Clinic - Spring 2016

The Cyberlaw Clinic, based at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, engages Harvard Law School students in a wide range of real-world client counseling, licensing and transactional, litigation, advocacy, and policy projects and cases, covering a broad spectrum of issues relating to technology and the Internet. The Clinics work includes offering legal guidance in the areas of communications infrastructure; consumer protection, privacy, and compliance; cybercrime and youth online safety; general Internet business law; intellectual property (including copyright, trademark, and patent); litigation and amicus advocacy; online speech, media law, and the First Amendment; and technology and access to justice.

Cyberlaw Clinic - Winter 2016

The winter term Cyberlaw Clinic is a by-application offering for advanced students only (student who have taken a prior semester of the clinic). The Cyberlaw Clinic, based at Harvards Berkman Center for Internet and Society, engages Harvard Law School students in a wide range of real-world client counseling, licensing and transactional, litigation, advocacy, and policy projects and cases, covering a broad spectrum of issues relating to technology and the Internet.

Cyberlaw Clinic Seminar - Spring 2016

This seminar is required for all students enrolled in the Cyberlaw Clinic. The course incorporates instruction about substantive legal issues at the heart of the Clinics practice, case studies and exercises designed to enhance students practice skills, and consideration of questions of ethics and professional responsibility that arise in the Clinics practice.

Fair Trial - Spring 2016

We begin with the concept of justice -- both substantive and procedural. We ground our discussions in the The Bill of Rights -- in its concepts of liberty, freedom, public domain, public trial, confrontation, fair opportunity to defend, and jury.

JuryX: Deliberations for Social Change - Winter 2016

The class will consider campus issues of law, race, class and gender. You will explore the concept of jury in both theory and practice. You will learn about the jury in political theory and history. You will engage as co-learners in small-group deliberations, real and virtual, synchronous and asynchronous. You will gain hands-on experience of persuading and being persuaded. You will learn about your self and your jury in relation to others. You will be stimulated to explore who you are.

Law and the International Economy - Spring 2016

This course is designed to introduce first-year students to the architecture of the international economic law system. Its emphasis is on elements of international law that affect cross-border economic transactions and deals. The first part of the course examines the nature and sources of international law. The course then shifts to provide an overview of international commercial litigation, the trade and investment regimes, and emergent areas such as international regulation of corruption and corporate social responsibility.

Music and Digital Media - Spring 2016

This course explores a variety of legal issues relating to the creation, exploitation, and protection of music and other content. The seminar focuses on traditional legal regimes and business models and the ways in which new technologies (particularly the evolution of digital media and the Internet) have affected legal and business strategies involved in the making and distribution of content. The courses primary emphases are music and the ways in which legal principles manifest themselves in practice in the music industry.