Mar 15 2016 12:00pm to Mar 15 2016 12:00pm

Back to the Drawing Board: Student Privacy in Massachusetts K-12 Schools

with Jessie Rossman and Kade Crockford of the ACLU of Massachusetts

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 at 12:00 pm
Harvard Law School campus
Wasserstein Hall, Room 1019, 1st Floor

In 2013, the ACLU of Massachusetts set out to get a snapshot of student privacy policies in diverse communities statewide. We filed public records requests with dozens of school districts, asking for information about how they manage student information and handle digital student privacy issues. The responses were stunning: almost across the board, schools told students they had “no expectation of privacy” on school networks, using school email, or on school devices. The Supreme Court has said students don’t shed their constitutional rights at the schoolhouse gates. How can we apply this maxim in the digital age?

About Jessie

Jessie Rossman joined the ACLU of Massachusetts as a staff attorney in June 2013. She has both trial level and appellate advocacy experience, and litigates on a broad range of civil rights and civil liberties issues, including privacy and technology, free speech, reproductive rights, and gender discrimination.

About Kade 

Kade Crockford is the Director of the Technology for Liberty Program at the ACLU of Massachusetts. Kade works to protect and expand core First and Fourth Amendment rights and civil liberties in the digital 21st century, focusing on how systems of surveillance and control impact not just the society in general but their primary targets—people of color, Muslims, immigrants, and dissidents.

About the Privacy Series
In the fall of 2015, the Berkman Center decided to further surface and highlight our work ongoing work on privacy through the launch of a Berkman Privacy Series, a collection of talks, papers, and other activities, both current and past, that seek to explore and address the increasing concerns about Big Data, which have focused national and international attention on questions of online privacy. Not all of our privacy work is collected in this list, but our hope is that this limited selection, including the future events listed, will serve to increase awareness, foster discussion, and help explore alternative mechanisms for balancing user privacy with the potential benefits of Big Data.

Last updated date

June 3, 2016