Interactive

The Berkman Center's Interactive collection features conversations with and talks by leading cyber-scholars, entrepreneurs, activists, and policymakers as they explore topics such as: the factors that influence knowledge creation and dissemination in the digital age; the character of power as the worlds of governance, business, citizenship, and the media meet the Internet; and the opportunities, role, and limitations of new technologies in learning.

All Berkman events, including conferences, luncheon series talks, and most meetings, are webcast then archived here, along with unique productions like the Citizen Media Law Project podcast and episodes of Berkman.tv. A selection of the archive is also available on Berkman's YouTube channel.

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Learners

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Learners" chapter, was created by Ashley Lee, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Safety

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Safety" chapter, was created by Adi Kamdar, Djordje Krivokapic, and Andy Guess, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Overload

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Overload" chapter, was created by Gregory Asmolov and Eliane Bucher, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Activists

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Activists" chapter, was created by Andrea Davis, Sarah Hamdi, and Andri Tai-Ward, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Identities

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Identities" chapter, was created by Denise Linn, Paul Kominers, Molly Sauter, and Sunanda Vaidheesh, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Aggressors

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Aggressors" chapter, was created by Hannah Deresiewicz and Sunanda Vaidheesh, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Quality

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Quality" chapter, was created by Anisha Gulabani, Andrea Davis, Alan Cheuk, and Alex Fayette, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Innovators

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Innovators" chapter, was created by Hannah Deresiewicz and Sunanda Vaidheesh, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Re:Born Digital, in Video: Privacy

The summer 2010 class of interns at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society took on a huge assignment: pick a chapter from Urs Gasser and John Palfrey's book, Born Digital, and make a short video inspired by that chapter. This video, inspired by the "Privacy" chapter, was created by Adi Kamdar, Andrea von Kaenel, Ellery Biddle, Rebekah Heacock, and Seth Flaxman, with production assistance from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society/Youth and Media project. It is released under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Non-Commercial license. Find out more about the project here: http://youthandmedia.org/

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berkman interactive

Cynthia Dwork: I'm in the Database, but Nobody Knows

A statistical database provides statistical information about a population, while maintaining the privacy of individuals in the database. A thriving research effort has produced high-quality differentially private solutions for a wide range of data analysis tasks. In this talk, Cynthia Dwork—a theoretical computer scientist and Distinguished Scientist at Microsoft Research—gives a feel for the broad spectrum of things that can be done by accessing information through a privacy-preserving programming interface, and touches on some privacy problems arising in the context of behavioral targeting.

berkman interactive

Radio Berkman 164: The University in Cyberspace

What should be the mission of universities in cyberspace? What can universities contribute to the future of the internet? How can our educational institutions promote ideals of free exchange of information yet cope with the complex intellectual property challenges presented by the net? A group of academic experts, University professors, administrators, and innovators met up to discuss solutions to this very issue at a conference entitled University and Cyberspace: Reshaping Knowledge Institutions for the Networked Age earlier this summer. Charles Nesson was one of those participants. He joined David Weinberger in the studio to talk about how the University can tackle these challenges head on.

berkman interactive

Radio Berkman 163: I Am Not a Lawyer

Last week Jonathan Zittrain and Larry Lessig co-host a definitive tour of how the competitive landscape for the digital technology market has evolved in the 12 years since the famous Microsoft antitrust battle. Ever wondered how Microsoft got in trouble in the first place? Google’s got all those little apps and widgets that run our lives — is that legal? And could Apple’s Steve Jobs be the next to get hauled in front of a federal judge? This week segment producers (and non-lawyers) Daniel Dennis Jones and Molly Sauter take on “Competition” in plain English, with viewpoints from Ken Auletta, Siva Vaidhyanathan, Gary Reback, Phil Malone, and Brian Chen.

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berkman interactive

Eric von Hippel Models a Paradigm Shift From Producer Innovation to User and Open Collaborative Innovation

How does innovation work? Innovation by individual users and open collaborative innovation are both competing with (and may displace) producer innovation in many parts of the economy. Eric von Hippel—T Wilson Professor of Innovation Management, and Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT—presents the basic story and discusses some of the important implications for public policy, and interesting research opportunities of this major paradigm shift.

berkman interactive

Radio Berkman 162: Lessig & Zittrain Take On… Competition

The year was 1998. Cher’s autotune anthem Believe was one of the year’s biggest hits, Titanic had swept the Oscars, and in some sterile software campus in the Northwest, Bill Gates was rehearsing a deposition. It’s been over 12 years since Gates’ and Microsoft’s anti-trust battle with the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission first hit the courts. It is still seen as a watershed for the management of technology companies in the dot com age. But in the dozen years that have passed, people are still speculating whether the anti-trust case against Microsoft made any difference, and whether the software and technology companies of today are engaging in anti-competitive practices similar to or more risky than the ones that got Microsoft in trouble. Who are the Microsofts of today? Facebook? Apple? Google? And how do we manage competition in the digital age? Today, two of the leading minds on the internet and law, Jonathan Zittrain and Larry Lessig, take on competition.

berkman interactive

Radio Berkman 161: A Brief History of Noise

Noise is distracting and irritating enough in the real world. Our focus is easily disrupted by unwanted clutter and sounds from our surrounding environment. So we often find ourselves turning to digital spaces to try control the chaos, and concentrate on tasks. But noise still exists in the virtual world, and is often more insidious. Digital distractions disguise themselves as useful information — posts from friends on Twitter and Facebook, text messages, email, and instant messaging. Separating the noise from the signal is often an arduous and personalized task. And as a new generation of youngsters grows up with mobile phones and uninterrupted network connectivity, researchers fret about a possible information overload and its effects on attention span. Today’s guest, Kate Crawford, is an Associate Professor in Media Research at the University of New South Wales. She has spent some time researching how noise inserts itself into our lives, particularly through mobile technologies. She spoke with David Weinberger about the history of noise and how noise lives on in the digital world. Music this week from Clone: “Private Reserve” (composed by Kate Crawford and Bo Daley)

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berkman interactive

Kate Crawford on Mobile Social Media and Attention

Debates are raging about reduced attention spans and information overload — with particular focus on young people being at risk. How do we manage the increasing demands of network connectivity, from mobiles, email, and social media? Sharing early findings from a large, three-year study of mobile media use in Australia, Dr Kate Crawford — author of Adult Themes and Associate Professor in Media Research at the University of New South Wales — brings an historical context to the idea of noise, and gives a snapshot of how 'mobile social spheres' are developing, especially among young people.

berkman interactive

Radio Berkman 160: Business, Meet Web

In the early days of the LLC launching a business might have been a simple task. After all, chances are your partners were close by and you probably worked within the laws of your state. It was mostly a local task. Setting your shingle out in the 21st Century might be a bit more arduous. You’ve got partners in different time zones, and where once you might have met face to face, now you’re making decisions over conference call, IM, maybe even Twitter and Facebook. And all of the paperwork and record keeping involved with staying legal seems somehow past its expiration date. Today’s guest says the LLC was probably one of the greatest inventions of all time, on par with the steam engine and electricity. This legal infrastructure for operating a business helped promote innovation by pinning the cost of risk to a collective entity rather than to the individual. But the humble LLC has a lot of growing to do if it wants to keep up with the digital revolution. Oliver Goodenough — of the Law Lab at the Berkman Center — talks with guest interviewer Zeba Khan about the evolution of business law, and a new initiative he’s been working on with the State of Vermont to let new businesses function online.

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berkman interactive

Nalini Kotamraju on the Tension between User-centered Design and E-government Services

Individuals and institutions are slower to adopt e-government services due to a lack of user centricity in design and development. Work with PortNL, an integrated e-government service for expatriates in the Netherlands, suggests the core of governments' difficulty in creating user-centered services lies in a fundamental tension between the needs of users and those of governments. In this talk, Nalini Kotamraju — an Assistant Professor at the University of Twente in the Netherlands — explains how the purposes of e-government services can be met through a user-centered design approach, and how site builders can put the needs of users ahead of the ideas of governmental clients.

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Radio Berkman 159: Spare a Cycle?

What are you doing with your spare cycles? You know, the bits of time you spend on the web when you’re not really being productive? Maybe you’re waiting for a file to download. Maybe you’re playing a game. Maybe you’re even filling out a form. All of these little moments could in fact be put to good use. In some cases, they are. And you might not even know it. For instance, when you type out a Captcha — those little squiggly words on a web form you transcribe to prove you’re human — you are in fact transcribing a word from a scanned book. A word that is illegible to a computer’s eye. Here, you’re simultaneously proving you are a human being (not a robot), and also doing a good deed (helping to transcribe text). You can thank today’s guest for that little innovation. Luis von Ahn — professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University and expert in the field of human computation — explores the little innovations on the web that are harnessing the power of millions to change the world. Not always for the good.

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berkman interactive

Vivek Wadhwa on Women and Minorities in Entrepreneurship

What makes entrepreneurs successful? What inhibits them? Vivek Wadhwa is a senior research associate with the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School and an executive in residence/adjunct professor at the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University. In this talk he discusses the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, the success of Indians in Silicon Valley, and the dearth of women and minorities.

berkman interactive

Radio Berkman 158: Thinking About Thinking About the Net

Take a look at the headlines of any major newspaper or news magazine. Check out the non-fiction bestsellers at Amazon. The net is on everyone’s minds. Or more specifically, the way the net is on our minds is on our minds. Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows paints a bleak picture of what the net is doing to our plastic brains, cheapening our relationships, and ruining our attention spans. Clay Shirky’s recent release Cognitive Surplus on the other hand celebrates the web’s power to enable quick, smart, crowdsourced action and creativity. Hundreds of other authors and thinkers have responded with their own variations and theories on what the internet is doing to us, and what we are doing on the net. With all of this thinking on the net, we thought it was time to do some thinking on the thinking on the net. And luckily we have two great thinker thinkers in house. Our very own David Weinberger has suggested jokingly that there should be a Myers-Briggs test for net fanaticism, while memetracker and ROFLCon founder Tim Hwang has grouped net thinkers into schools. Today, they explain how different thinkers think on the net, and importantly, why the heck everyone’s so interested.

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berkman interactive

Patrick Meier on Crowdsourcing Crisis Mapping

Patrick Meier — Director of Crisis Mapping and Strategic Partnerships at Ushahidi — has published widely on the topic of conflict early warning and blogs at iRevolution.net and EarlyWarning. Here he discusses how Ushahidi's open source mapping system has been used to help those on the ground report issues and connect swiftly with responders during crises and major events such as the recent earthquake in Haiti, the Gulf oil spill, and elections in Sudan.

berkman interactive

Radio Berkman 157: Gaming Grief

MMORPGs may maim and pwn but words will never hurt me. In online gaming environments you may be getting shot at, impaled, or run over by tanks. But the more serious damage may come in the form of the offensive chatter bandied about casually between players connected remotely via headsets. Racist, homophobic, and sexist language proliferates as gamers trash talk. But often such language and name calling is used, not to offend, but to distract and gain attention. Such “Griefing” behavior is meant to be ironic. “I am not racist/sexist/homophobic,” a griefer will think, “therefore, my use of an offensive term is just a joke. If you interpret it any other way then you just don’t get it.” But that doesn’t mean griefing doesn’t have an impact. Lisa Nakamura — Professor in the Institute of Communication Research at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and author of the book Digitizing Race: Visual Cultures of the Internet — spoke to David Weinberger about the origins of griefing, and how online communities are dealing with it.

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berkman interactive

Lewis Hyde on Creating an Enduring Commons

The founding generation in the United States hoped to establish a cultural commons of art and ideas, a lively public domain of created works that all of us use because nobody controls it. But the founders did not leave us with any good way to protect this commons. How might an unguarded public domain be converted into a rule-governed and thus durable cultural commons? Lewis Hyde — author of the forthcoming book, Common as Air: Revolution, Art, and Ownership — is a poet, essayist, translator, and cultural critic with a particular interest in the public life of the imagination.

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berkman interactive

Nancy Baym on Changing Relationships, Changing Industries

Entertainment industry professionals have generally related to their audiences in terms of economic (market) exchange while fans have generally related to one another in terms of social (gift) exchange. The internet has enabled audiences to connect with one another, to share music, and to become visible to and interact directly with artists in new ways. Dr. Nancy Baym — author of Tune In, Log on: Soaps, Fandom, and On-Line Community and Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Kansas — argues that musicians are increasingly pushed toward models of engagement with audiences that integrate social and economic exchange, and raises questions about how new systems of value and reward may be developing.

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